Keep Watch Over Yourselves

So Jesus said to the Jews who had believed him, “If you abide in my word, you are truly my disciples, and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” (John 8:31-32)

I have just spent a good part of my morning reading a Facebook thread on a post by Steven Bancarz concerning TPT (The Passion Translation).

Not surprisingly, there were plenty of “arguments” made, both opposed to and in favor of TPT. As I read the many, many, many comments, I did my best to keep an open mind. But I must admit that my objectivity and my heart was shattered when I came across this: https://youtu.be/1nTFcsSlFvM

Please note, this post is not intended to open a discussion on the merits or lack thereof, for the TPT, you can go elsewhere for that. It is only intended to give you some information that has come to my attention. I encourage to do your own research then thoughtfully and prayerfully come to your own conclusion.


As you begin your research, here is some info you may find helpful.

Definition of Translation

Translation is the communication of meaning from one language (the source) to another language (the target). Translation refers to written information, whereas interpretation refers to spoken information. … Translation has been used by humans for centuries, beginning after the appearance of written literature.

Methods of Translation (of the Bible)

  1. Literal translation. Attempts to keep the exact words and phrases of the original. It is faithful to the original text, but sometimes hard to understand. Keeps a constant historical distance. Examples: King James Version (KJV), New American Standard Bible (NASB).
  2. Dynamic equivalent (thought for thought) translation. Attempts to keep a constant historical distance with regard to history and facts, but updates the writing style and grammar. Examples: New International Version (NIV), Revised English Bible (REB).
  3. Free translation (paraphrase). Translates the ideas from the original text but without being constrained by the original words or language. Seeks to eliminate historical distance. Readable, but possibly not precise. Examples: The Living Bible (TLB), The Message.
Best Known Bible Translations
  • American Standard Version ASVThe American Standard Version, also known as the Standard American Edition, Revised Version, is a revised version of the KJV. It was completed in 1885 and newly edited by the American Revision Committee in 1901.
  • Common English Bible CEBThe Common English Bible is a translation of the scriptures intended to be a comfortable reading level for over half of all English readers. It attempts to substitute more traditional biblical terminology with more natural wording.
  • English Standard Version ESVThe ESV Bible is a relatively new Bible translation that combines word-for-word precision and accuracy with literary excellence, beauty, and readability.
  • GOD’S WORD Translation GWGOD’S WORD Translation (GW) accurately translates the meaning of the original texts into clear, everyday language. Readable and reliable, GW is living, active, and life-changing.
  • Good News Translation GNTThe Good News Translation was first published in 1976 by the American Bible Society in a “common language.” The simple, everyday language makes it especially popular for children and those learning English.
  • Holman Christian Standard Bible CSBThe HCS is a highly readable, accurate translation written in modern English. It is published by Holman Bible Publishers, the oldest Bible publisher in America.
  • Jubilee Bible 2000 JUBTranslated from the Original Texts in Hebrew and Greek into Spanish by Casiodoro de Reina (1569) and compared with the revision of Cipriano de Valera (1602)Based on the New Testament of Francisco de Enzinas (1543) and on the New Testament (1556) with the Psalms (1557) of Juan Pérez de PinedaThis material was translated from Spanish into English by Russell M. Stendal and compared with the Old English Translation of William Tyndale (Pentateuch of 1530, Ploughboy Edition New Testament of 1534, Joshua to 2 Chronicles of 1537, and Jonah). It was also compared word for word with the Authorized Version (by King James) of 1611.
  • King James Version KJVThe KJV is the first version of Scripture authorized by the Protestant church and commissioned by England’s King James I.
  • Lexham English Bible LEBThe LEB complements your primary translation with its transparent design and literal rendering. It helps you see the text of God’s Word from another angle.
  • Douay-Rheims Catholic Bible RHEThe Douay-Rheims is the translation upon which nearly all English Catholic Bible versions are based. It includes the seven Deutero-Canonical books (also known as the Apocrypha).
  • New American Standard Bible NASThe NAS is written in a formal style, but is more readable than the King James Version. It is highly respected as the most literal English translation of the Bible.
  • New International Version NIVThe NIV offers a balance between a word-for-word and thought-for-thought translation and is considered by many as a highly accurate and smooth-reading version of the Bible in modern English.
  • New King James Version NKJVThe NKJ is a modern language update of the original King James Version. It retains much of the traditional interpretation and sentence structure of the KJV.
  • New Living Translation NLTUsing modern English, the translators of the NLT focused on producing clarity in the meaning of the text rather than creating a literal, word-for-word equivalence. Their goal was to create a clear, readable translation while remaining faithful to original texts.
  • New Revised Standard NRSThe New Revised Standard is a popular translation that follows in the traditions of the King James and Revised Standard Versions. It was written with the goal of preserving the best of the older versions while incorporating modern English.
  • Revised Standard Version RSVThe Revised Standard Version is a revision of the King James Version, the Revised Version, and American Standard Version. This text is intended for both private reading and public worship.
  • The Message Bible MSGThe Message is a paraphrase from the original languages written by Eugene, H. Peterson. The Message provides a fresh and unique Bible-reading experience.

🖋Sandra.

“So will My word be which goes forth from My mouth; It will not return to Me empty, Without accomplishing what I desire, And without succeeding in the matter for which I sent it.” (Isaiah 55:11)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s